Hills’ final scene cleverly acknowledges its fakeness

The Hills ended its sixth and final season last night with a clever scene that acknowledged how scripted, fake, and overly produced it has become.

Kristin Cavallari and Brody Jenner say a quasi-emotional goodbye, and as Brody watches her car drive away, all set to a montage featuring a remixed version of the show’s theme song. Then came the reveal: the background behind him slid away, revealed to be just an image of the Hollywood sign. He was standing between soundstages, and the camera pulled back to reveal that her car stopped a few feet away, and there are lights and cameras and reflectors everywhere. They hug, the crew high-fives, and anyone who didn’t think it was fake before suddenly has their mind blown. (Gawker has video of the final moments.)

It as actually really well-done, because the earlier part of their goodbye scene was filmed on a real street with traffic going by, and there was footage of her car driving a significant distance. So in a big meta-joke, they faked the real (but still fake) ending.

And if there’s any doubt that there was even the slightest hint of reality, Kristin told People yesterday that the relationship isn’t real: ““Nothing you see on TV is real. Fans need to understand it’s all entertainment. It’s all in fun. I would never put my close friends or a real relationship on a show.”

Frankie leads Big Brother's parade of delusion

Frankie on Big Brother

Heading into the finale, the delusion continues, with a re-appearance by evicted Frankie.

Related: The unwatchable cast of Fox's Utopia keeps yelling and screaming.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.