Producers made Frank wait to break up with Ali, allowing Chris Harrison his usual outrage

Frank Neuschaefer’s decision to bail on Ali Fedotowsky on Monday’s episode of The Bachelorette was delayed until Tahiti by the show’s producers to increase drama. Reliable Bachelor spoiler Reality Steve’s production moles told him that:

“Frank had told producers about Nicole long before this episode. He wanted to tell Ali about her as far back as NY. But, that wouldn’t make for good TV. Essentially Frank knew he wanted to leave for a while, but wasn’t allowed to. It was finally agreed upon that, ‘Ok Frank, we’ll let you tell Ali about Nicole. But you’ll do it on our terms. You will tell her in Tahiti, and we will film you getting back with Nicole to make it more dramatic.’ Basically, tit for tat. They let him leave, but not under his circumstances. He was going to do it in a way that would make it the most dramatic exit possible. …

… Just like they knew they had the Jessica storyline back home with Justin and waited until after his 2-on-1 with Kasey to play it, they knew as early as New York that there was potential with the Nicole storyline. They just figured having him leave in Tahiti to say he still loved an ex-girlfriend wouldn’t be enough unless they showed him struggling with his feelings and talking to her.”

Interestingly, DeAnna Pappas points out how the producers make decisions about what the show’s cast members do and when, although she’s not exactly suggesting a conspiracy here. told Us Weekly “Everybody’s so mad at him for doing this, but, to an extent, I think producers told him this was how it needed to be done, and he had to break up with her on camera to give the viewers an explanation.”

If it’s true that producers made him wait, it begs one question, which is why he let them control him like that. And it also makes Chris Harrison’s usual hatchet man work on the show’s enemies seem even more seedy than usual. The host told TV Guide that “I don’t love the way it went down, how late it took him to come to grips with everything because obviously he was having these thoughts for weeks. So why wait until then to even say anything?”

Maybe because that makes it possible for you to say something now, Chris?

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.