Jersey Shore may get around $30K an episode, a 200% raise

The Jersey Shore cast, including Nicole Polizzi (Snooki), Mike Sorrentino (The Situation), and Pauly Del Vecchio, will likely get a raise that brings their salaries close to a requested $30,000 per episode, a 200 percent increase, after they once again used tabloid web sites to protest their salaries.

TMZ reported that they were “supposed to begin shooting ‘at home’ scenes today for season three, but we’re told JWoww, Ronnie, Sammi, Pauly D and Vinny — who are spread out between New York and Rhode Island — told the crews they weren’t shooting without new contracts.” And Radar reported that “the cast’s original two-season deal became muddied when MTV decided to break season 2 into two parts, which they are contractually calling ‘cycle’ 2A and 2B.”

According to The Hollywood Reporter, “The cast initially asked the network for $30,000 per episode — a 200% raise. MTV is countering with a number that’s close to that figure, and at least a couple key members of the cast are expected to accept by the end of the day.” However, the paper notes that “the salary increase may not kick into effect until a presumed third season” when “all [cast members] are expected to return.”

The cast’s group negotiations paid off for season two: They were paid $5,000 an episode on season one and got a raise to $10,000 an episode for season two. Also, it’s very smart of them to negotiate now, before season two airs, just in case ratings tank because they’re so self-conscious that it ruins the fun.

Survivor San Juan Del Sur's dark cloud is lifted

John Rocker

In its third episode, Survivor San Juan Del Sur improved significantly as John Rocker faced off against an Amazing Race villain. But the Exile Island reward challenge remains a drag on the series.


Why Dick Donato left Big Brother 13

Dick Donato

The Big Brother villain known as "Evel Dick" has finally revealed why he left the show during its 13th season: he learned he was HIV positive.

Also: Dick claims he had no choice but to leave the game.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.