Andrew leaves Big Brother after spectacular speech; viewers voting on next saboteur

Three weeks after its debut, Big Brother 12 finally got interesting, thanks to a big pre-eviction speech by Andrew that Julie Chen called “the best last plea speech I’ve ever seen.” While Andrew’s take-down of Kristen (of all people!) didn’t work to save him, as he was evicted unanimously (and hilariously by Ragan: “I vote to institutionalize and evict Andrew”), it immediately began to cause tension in the house, just as his rant at the veto meeting also started drama.

First, Andrew and Brendon’s “plan,” which Rachel put in quotation marks when she learned about it because it made little sense, backfired. Matt explained that “Rachel had this horribly fake reaction to” Andrew’s veto meeting comments, so Matt knew it wasn’t real. Once again, Matt has no idea what he’s talking about, since Rachel didn’t know, and when she confronted Brendon, he just planted his pouty face on her face to stop her from asking questions.

For some reason–and I’m sure this is one of those occasions when live feed watchers have a lot more context, but whatever, the live show needs to provide that to those of us who have lives (ha)–Andrew melted down even more and told Kristen “don’t play me like a fiddle; don’t play me any more.” She got mad at him and even started screaming, meaning she was actually on screen. I didn’t quite understand the conflict, perhaps because I was just too fascinated with the fact that she was in an episode.

With all of this, I can’t believe the show wasted a few minutes on Julie Chen’s mindless “interview” with the houseguests that included a conversation with Lane about shooting glowing eyes and Enzo’s pronunciation of certain words. We already saw that, show us some of the drama from the previous five days. Dammit. During his HOH interview, Matt said Hayden is the weak link in their alliance, forgetting that he is in his own alliance.

One useful bit of filler was an interview with Matt’s wife, who told us “the way his brain works isn’t like anybody else’s” because “he lacks all common sense.” She was “extremely shocked” by his lie about her having a disease, and said, “I don’t agree with what he did, I don’t think it was a good move on Matt’s part” because he “didn’t think of all the repercussions” but isn’t “malicious or evil.” Well, wrong: His lie subjected her to being interviewed on camera and ridiculed by people who probably have no place ridiculing people for the way they look. But I digress.

Andrew’s big speech was the highlight of the night, as he called out Kristen and Hayden and told everyone “you need help getting these two out” because
“you have to break up two alliances in this house.” Kristen made sure we saw her by opening her mouth as wide as it could go,” and Andrew ended by saying, “watch out for Kristen, guys. Captain Kosher, out.” Kristen tried to argue back, and that caused the Chenbot to spin out of control: “Houseguests! Kristen, this is not your chance to talk.”

After Andrew was evicted, Julie Chen schooled Andrew–a doctor, did you know?– that Matt’s wife a real disease but Matt lied about it. In other words, although the producers are sequestering the evicted houseguests, they cannot let them back into the house–unless they’re just going to dispense with fairness, since Andrew will undoubtedly tell the others, and that would be unfair to Matt, even though he deserves to have that blow up in his face.

The HOH competition allowed the houseguests to call out their enemies repeatedly, but Rachel–who’s proving herself to be quite the player, though not quite yet of Janelle proportions in terms of surprising us with her intelligence–won again. She immediately went after Kristen, saying, “Why don’t you grab a life vest because you’re a floater and float on off because you’re in dangerous waters, Kristen. I have this key and that means I get to make nominations.”

That arrogance is never good–at least for a houseguest. Like the rest of the episode’s events, it’s good for us and the remaining six weeks of the series. The return of the saboteur–we can now vote on a new saboteur, so Annie won’t return–and Pandora’s Box may not be necessary after all.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.