Biggest Loser contestant says producers, show “gave me a really fun eating disorder”

Biggest Loser 3 runner-up Kai Hibbard lost 118 pounds on the show, but has become its most vocal critic. She was previously cited by the New York Times in a piece about the show’s problems, and now, she told Body Love Wellness’ Golda Poretsky that the show “gave me a really fun eating disorder that I battle every day, and it also messed up my mental body image because the lighter I got during that T.V. show, the more I hated my body.”

In the three-part interview, which Perez Hilton unapologetically stole and plagiarized, she talks about mistreatment at the hands of the producers and discusses the ways they overrode the show’s doctors’ orders. She says, “Sue me if you want to, NBC, but I’m telling these people, I didn’t lose 12 pounds in a week. It didn’t happen. It wasn’t a week. And even when it looks like I lost 12 pounds in a week … I was so severely dehydrated that I was completely unhealthy.” She says a week on the show actually “varied. It went from 14 days and I believe that near the end we had one week that was 5 days.”

She also says that the trainers encouraged and actually taught contestants how to dehydrate themselves. In the final part of the interview, published this week, Kai says “the trainers tell you” and said that the gym helped contestants dehydrate themselves because it was so hot: it “wasn’t a real gym, it was a temporary structure just for shooting and it didn’t have any air conditioning and you’d shut all the doors and all the windows in the gym. Then you would work out for two, two and half hours (as long as you could stand it) without any water.”

A Dose Of Reality: My Exclusive Interview With Biggest Loser Finalist, Kai Hibbard (Part 1 of 3), part 2, and part 3 [Body Love Wellness via Jezebel]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.