Big Brother 12′s twist: a saboteur (or basically just America’s Player renamed)

Big Brother 12‘s twist has been revealed, and it’s a variation of one we’ve seen before. One contestant will be a saboteur, and will “disrupt the lives of fellow players” based on viewer suggestions. In other words, they’re bringing back America’s Player from season 8, although with two changes: the other houseguests will know that someone is trying to sabotage them, and that person won’t be playing the regular game.

A CBS press release says that when they move in, “Houseguests will discover that one of them is not really there to win the game, but rather to sabotage their fellow players,” and their “mission will be to carry out viewer suggestions on how best to disrupt the lives of fellow players. … The longer the saboteur is able to maintain their anonymity while carrying out their fan-inspired sabotage, the more financially rewarding it will be for them.”

Executive producer Allison Grodner, who is in charge of the drug-addled monkey, said in a press release that this “will make life for the Houseguests harder than ever before. This is a twist that will wreak havoc on the house and the audience will be a part of it.”

Besides recycling something we’ve already seen, this twist borrows even more from The Mole than America’s Player did, but Big Brother is no Mole. And I generally find Big Brother‘s attempts to fuck with the contestants’ already fragile heads to be distasteful and stupid at best, never mind how the producers manipulated America’s Player to do their bidding, so this isn’t something I’m looking forward to.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.