Phil Keoghan now has his own energy bar

Phil Keoghan has his own brand of eliminations, and now he has his own energy bar, Phil Keoghan’s NOW Energy Bar, and he’s working “to develop a comprehensive consumer products program” with his agency, according to a press release. In other words, more PhilProducts!

The company is giving away 500 free samples of the energy bar before selling it on Amazon later this month. In his press release quote, Phil (and/or a publicist/ad agency copywriter) does his best to link the energy bar to his day job:

“NOW stands for No Opportunity Wasted, my personal philosophy for living each day as if it were your last. I have been filming around the world for more than 20 years, working in over 100 countries, and one of the biggest challenges I face is making sure I get the right nutrition. After searching the planet for the perfect bar, I found the answer in an all natural high-protein bar made with Manuka Honey, found in my homeland New Zealand, a natural preservative with special medicinal properties and jam-packed with high potency energy that will power any adventure.”

Phil has had other products under the NOW brand: a short-lived reality series and a book that now has a “bargain price” of $5.42. And now his face is on food:

Phil bar

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.