Blagojevich mangles Harry Potter names, Donald Trump unleashes stereotypes

Not until The Celebrity Apprentice 3 teams presented their task did last night’s episode really hit, but it was amazing. They created walk-through displays to advertise Universal Studios’ new attraction The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, and between Cyndi Lauper shrieking, Goldberg dressed up as a tree and doing double-duty as the sorting hat’s voice, and Curtis Stone talking to kid about his wand, it was the perfect combination of humility, self-inflicted humiliation, and absurdity that makes the series so great.

Even better, all of this happened while they were trying to promote a product. Product placement has become a scourge on some shows, but here, the fact that the contestants mangle names and accidentally mock the brand is part of the fun.

Rod Blagojevich was eventually fired: not because he called the Harry Potter houses “Slythering” and “Ravencloth,” but because he can’t use a laptop or cell phone and didn’t communicate well with his team while in Orlando. Of course, Donald Trump fired him by saying, “I have great respect for you.” Well, keep in New York, then, because I doubt many people in Illinois feels the same way.

But the Boardroom was kind of boring since Rod refused to throw people under the bus, which Trump explained by doing what Donald Trump does best: reducing people to easily-understandable attributes and stereotypes. Watch:

But the real joy came from watching the two teams present their Harry Potter attraction walk-throughs. As Bret Michaels said, “All of us are going to prison after this creepy castle ride.” Just try not to laugh while watching them:

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.