Miami businesses saying no to Jersey Shore because of its insane contract

Businesses in Miami Beach are rejecting requests for MTV to film the cast of Jersey Shore at their establishments, and in at least some cases, it’s because of the insane contract producers ask locations to sign.

The contract “gives Snooki, JWoww, The Situation and the others the right to do anything they want on a property whose owner signs — without any liability for producers, Double Guns LLC, and MTV,” The Palm Beach Post reports. The paper says the show has been rejected by The W Hotel, the Delano hotel, the Mondrian hotel, The Shore Club, and Rapids Water Park.

The water park’s spokesperson said that’s because “the contract gives them the right to do whatever they want, including breaking things, trashing the place, and there’s nothing we could do. That’s too much of a risk.”

The full contract [PDF] also includes nutty–but, sadly, increasingly standard–passages like these:

“For dramatic purposes, (producers) may make certain misrepresentations to you and others. The Project may lead to emotional strains and pressures on you, your business, your friends, your co-workers and family.”

“Your actions and the actions of others displayed in the Project may be disparaging, embarrassing or of an otherwise unfavorable nature and may expose you, your business, your friends, your co-workers and/or your family to public ridicule, humiliation or condemnation.”

Rapids Water Park to Snooki: Get outtahere! [Palm Beach Post]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.