David Archuleta’s gay club appearance leads to awkward defense

David Archuleta went to a gay club last weekend, and when that led people to assume he must be gay himself, and by the reaction that prompted him to defend himself, you’d think he got a hand job at a massage parlor or something.

The American Idol 7 runner-up went to New York’s Club 57, which is part of Providence, and “was there with his friend Charice, who performed a dance remix of her current hit single, ‘Pyramid’ at the coveted 1:30 a.m. spot,” as a blog that follows his career and life, The David Chronicles, reported.

The blog noted that this was “David displaying some real independence, and making choices that, while hardly questionable (it would be far more questionable for a pop performer who is serious about their career to not become familiar with the gay club scene), are nevertheless choices that would have been virtually unthinkable a year ago. … And that can only be good.”

But that also led to speculation that he’s gay, because only gay people are permitted inside gay clubs, and that’s when things went downhill, because David felt the need to defend himself on Twitter, even though that shouldn’t have been necessary.

First he tweeted, “Mental note to self: always ask where before you go! Wasn’t my kind of place lol, and I had no clue! I guess you live and learn. The..” “upside was that Charice was awesome, and she has an incredible voice. Hope that clears things up! Been seeing some of the tweets.. sheesh!” he continued.

As The David Chronicles noted, “David was obviously in consultation with someone regarding how to respond to the hullabaloo” based on a deleted tweet, and his responses indicated that “he was leaning far more heavily on justifications demanded by his conservative constituents than on an inclination to defend inclusiveness and diversity.”

The vaguely homophobic nature of his first posts, the not “my kind of place” comment, led to the inevitable gay-friends defense, which never helps. David wrote, “I have friends who are gay, and they’re great people. Whether they’re gay or not doesn’t change how I think,” and followed that with an attempt to claim it wasn’t the gayness of the club that bothered him, but the partying: “I have nothing against anyone, I’m sorry if that’s how it came across. I’m just not into the partying scene lol,” he wrote.

I’m not sure anyone thought he was being critical of “the partying scene” when he said he should have asked before he went in, although that’s obviously preferable to claiming that you should have asked to see if there were gays inside before agreeing to go into a venue.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.