Jason, Molly’s wedding only draws 9 million, despite being “one of the most anticipated weddings of all time”

Jason Mesnick and Molly Malaney got married a week ago, and their wedding aired on ABC last night as part of a dull two-hour special that was only watched by 9.26 million people. That’s down significantly from the only other franchise wedding, Trista and Ryan’s Bachelorette wedding in 2003, which was watched by 17.1 million people, more than watched Princess Diana’s wedding in the U.S.

There was some drama at Jason and Molly’s wedding location, the Terranea Resort in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., where paparazzi invaded, holding cameras over hedges and eventually getting put in headlocks by security (and two of those paparazzi are suing ABC and producers claiming the production “breached their duty of reasonable conduct by attacking and detaining or authorizing the attack and detention” of the photographers).

Meanwhile, it rained all over their outdoor location, then stopped, and then, fantastically, started pouring in the middle of the ceremony, soaking both of them; apparently, ABC was too cheap to spring for a rain location. Jason Castro performed “Over the Rainbow” and was actually pretty good.

Meanwhile, Chris Harrison stood by and narrated the wedding and its preparations. And his superlatives got even more ridiculous, if that’s possible. He said that Jason became “one of the most hated men in America” after dumping Melissa–most hated, really?–and then said that Jason and Molly’s wedding was “one of the most anticipated weddings of all time?” He’s so ridiculous and nonsensical that I can’t imagine even he expects us to believe anything that ever comes out of his mouth.

By the way, Trista and Ryan, who received $1 million for their televised nuptials, were featured in part of the show that caught us up on relationships we don’t really care about long enough for Ryan to explain that a wedding isn’t for men, but “that day is for your wife.” Just like the cleaning and cooking, clearly.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.