Regular Apprentice will return to NBC with a flimsy connection to the recession

The non-celebrity Apprentice will return to NBC for a seventh season, the network just announced. Just under a year ago, NBC posted and removed a casting notice for the regular edition, which hasn’t aired in three years. There’s not been official word about the return date, but it will probably air in the fall.

The network’s press release says the show will attach itself to the recession, as “the boardroom will be open again for candidates who have been affected by the decline in the job market” and that “Trump will give the opportunity of their careers to 14 new candidates ranging in age — all of whom have been hit hard by the current economic downturn.”

However, it also says that candidates may be “talented and bright prospects who have lost their jobs with no hope in sight, people who are currently holding down jobs they don’t like just to make ends meet and recent college graduates who currently have few if any prospects.”

In other words: anybody.

Open casting calls have not yet been announced, but the show is casting via [email protected], and wants “information regarding how the recession has impacted their lives” in addition to “a recent photo as well as name, location and occupation history.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.