ABC’s Thin Ice special dropped audience’s vote because of “some sort of problem”

Friday and Sunday, ABC aired a two-episode special reality competition series called Thin Ice, and although it had a voting-related controversy, few people watched the pro skater competition. Canada’s Marie-France Dubreuil and U.S. champion Michael Weiss won, although Shizuka Arakawa and Stephane Lambiel were the most popular among home viewers who bothered to watch and vote.

After Friday’s performances, viewers voted online, and then votes from the judges and studio audience were supposed to be combined with that. But the in-person audience’s vote was left out because “the audience vote totals didn’t work, at first causing a bit of time killing and finally an announcement that the local vote wasn’t going to be included,” according to the Hartford Courant’s Roger Catlin.

ABC told Catlin today that “The company that managed that count, Quick Tally, had some sort of problem that wasn’t sorted out in time to include those votes in the final. They told our executive producer that in 21 years of service they’ve never had this sort of problem.”

But this hasn’t exactly become a scandal, perhaps because basically no one watched: TV By the Numbers said its Sunday night 18-49 rating was “nearly invisible,” and on Friday, only 4 million people watched.

A Winner on ‘Thin Ice,’ and Another Voting Controversy and Thin Ratings for ‘Ice’ [Hartford Courant]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.