Next week: American Idol consumes an additional night

Another week has gone by, and soon it’ll be another month. Here’s what to look forward to during the last full week of February.

The Past

The Forward

  • Sunday, Feb. 21
    Everybody Hates Chris actor Terry Crews gets his own docudrama, The Family Crews [BET, 9 p.m.], which follows his at-home life with his wife and five kids, while another celebrity docudrama, Keeping up with the Kardashians [E!, 10 p.m.] ends its fourth season. Tonight’s Amazing Race episode [CBS, 8 p.m.] has a great title: “When the Cow Kicked Me in the Head.” With this group, a kick to the head shouldn’t cause much damage at all.
  • Monday, Feb. 22
    The Buried Life [MTV, 10 p.m.] guys try to play basketball with Barack Obama, while the Cake Boss gets a best-of special [TLC, 9 p.m.] (already?).
  • Tuesday, Feb. 23
    Dirty Jobs [Discovery, 9 p.m.] ends its season with a look at the crew, as behind-the-scenes footage helps Mike Rowe try to find employment for his camera operators and other crew members during their hiatus. Meanwhile, American Idol 9 [Fox, 8 p.m.] begins to stomp all over the schedule with a two-hour performance episode during which the women will perform.
  • Wednesday, Feb. 24
    The top 24 contestants who have penises get to sing tonight on American Idol 9 [Fox, 8 p.m.].
  • Thursday, Feb. 25
    American Idol 9 [Fox, 8 p.m.] airs its first of three Thursday night results shows, and dumps two men and two women while facing off against a new episode of Survivor Heroes vs. Villains [CBS, 8 p.m.]. Later, there’s a new season of Police Women [TLC, 9 p.m.], but this one focuses on those in Maricopa County (the home of Phoenix) who are fortunate enough to have controversial and scary sheriff Joe Arpaio as their boss.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.