MTV’s time at Jersey Shore ends, but what about season two?

Surprising phenomenon Jersey Shore ended its first season last night, as Ronnie got out of jail and The Situation rejected Snooki’s hot tub advances, and that was all followed with a reunion, on which Sammi and Ronnie may have broken up. The National Post has a good recap of everything that happened during the actual episode (which, comparatively speaking, was pretty much nothing) while Us Weekly runs down the reunion drama.

A second season still hasn’t been confirmed, but it’s impossible to think MTV won’t renew the unscripted show that made it culturally relevant once again. (The L.A. Times’ Jon Caramanica argues it’s “MTV’s greatest cultural phenomenon since ‘Jackass,’ which I’m not quite sure is true, but he provides a good rundown of why it’s been successful.)

The big question is whether or not Jersey Shore‘s second season will follow The Real World and have a new cast, or whether Snooki and the gang will return, like The Hills. One thing that may affect that is whether they get spin-offs, like Snooki’s dating show.

Executive producer Sally Ann Salsano told RealScreen, “I don’t think we’ve seen the last of our cast, but there’s a wealth of those kids out there.”

A wealth of Snookis and Situations JWowws? Oh no.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.