Army did not apologize to Ryan Seacrest, whose arrested stalker is an Army reservist

Ryan Seacrest’s stalker, who was arrested Friday after entering the E! building with a knife and charged today with felony stalking, is not in the special forces or connected to the Green Berets, nor did the Army officially apologize to Seacrest for the stalker’s behavior. That misinformation comes courtesy TMZ, surprise.

The Army Times reports that “Sgt. Chidi Uzomah, Jr., is not the Special Forces expert that entertainment Web site, TMZ, was reporting as of Monday evening.” Instead, he “is a member of the Army Reserve’s 426th Civil Affairs Battalion in California. He served in the Californa Army National Guard from Arpil 2005 to April 2009. He was discharged to the Individual Ready Reserve until August 2009, when he took a voluntary reassignment to the Reserve.”

Army spokesman Lt. Col. Nathan Banks confirmed that Uzomah is a reservist but the paper reports that he “said it’s too early to tell whether the Army would get involved in the case.”

Banks also said the Army did not officially apologize, responding to TMZ’s report that quoted Banks and mischaracterizied his remarks–by making them more sensational. TMZ claimed “[t]he U.S. Army is issuing an official apology to Ryan Seacrest,” and said Banks told the tabloid site, “We apologize to Ryan Seacrest. Pending the outcome of the local investigation, the Army will decide what further action to take. We take all matters of our personnel seriously.”

But “Banks said he did not apologize to Seacrest on behalf of the Army, as TMZ indicates in its coverage,” The Army Times reports. Banks told the paper, “I’m sorry for what had happened to Mr. Seacrest, but the Army would not get involved until the civilian process has taken place.”

Reservist arrested for stalking Ryan Seacrest [Army Times]
Army Apologizes for Seacrest Stalker [TMZ]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.