Biggest Loser products will make $100 million this year; latest is The Biggest Loser Resort

The Biggest Loser may have become almost unwatchable with its bloated two-hour episodes and annoying product placement, but it is a massive success: it will “generate $100 million from health and fitness products this year,” Variety reports.

Among other things, they’ve sold 2.5 million books, have 450,000 subscribers for The Biggest Loser Club, and its “DVDs were the bestselling fitness videos of 2008,” Variety says. Executive producer Mark Koops said that a product line was part of their plan since the beginning. “The question was always, ‘How do we create a Weight Watchers for the 21st century?’ Television is still the greatest marketing tool, and we felt we could use it as a platform to expand.”

The newest product to feature the show’s name is an entire Utah spa that has rebranded as The Biggest Loser Resort at Fitness Ridge. A minimum of a week-long stay is required, and starts at $1,595 per week, promising on its web site “a boot camp style program for men and women of any fitness level” that “is aligned with The Biggest Loser lifestyle and features incredible hiking, stimulating cardio and stretch classes, delectable spa cuisine, and practical education.”

Also out today: A Biggest Loser Wii game that includes “a complete workout containing over 88 exercises, including upper and lower body, core, cardio and yoga” and “workout customization, a daily calendar for day planning and 50 healthy recipes from The Biggest Loser Cookbook.”

‘Loser’ licensing pumps up Reville [Variety]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.