Jon Gosselin suspends divorce, admits “poor judgement,” wants to be “partner in parenting”

A few hours after TLC announced Jon was being dropped from the title of a remade Jon and Kate Plus Eight, Jon revealed he’s suspending divorce proceedings and admits he’s “used poor judgement.” That’s according to an In Touch Weekly press release that has more information that the partial story on the magazine’s web site.

Jon’s attorney, Mark Jay Heller, told the magazine Jon “is hoping to inspire his wife to become less rigid, inflexible and controlling and open up. We’re hoping Jon and Kate can sit down together and start exploring what to do about their situation. Once they do that, the rest will fall into place.”

He filed today to suspend their divorce proceedings for 90 days, which he said “will enable Kate and me to restore our relationship as cooperative parents and to open up our lines of communication. I hope that she will be as receptive and enthusiastic as I am to do what is best for our family. … I would like to get back with Kate as a partner in parenting. Even though we were heading for a divorce, it appeared that Kate had been suffering from this divorce as much as I had. That’s why I asked my attorney to put the brakes on this divorce so I could try to regain control over the future of our family. So Kate and I could join on a cooperative course that would benefit our family — not destroy it.”

Jon told In Touch, “I regret my conduct since Kate and I separated [on June 22]. I used poor judgment in publicly socializing with other women so soon.”

He blames his dating and behavior on Kate’s refusal to go to counseling, telling the magazine, “When Kate broke up with me, I begged her to go with me to counseling. She was totally against it. I think I was reacting to the pain I have been suffering as a result of Kate’s rejection of me.”

Jon Gosselin stops the divorce [In Touch]
Jon Gosselin Suspends Divorce, Regrets Public Womanizing [In Touch press release]

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.