Macy Gray’s busted cherry, Ashley Hamilton leave DWTS; DeLay will keep not being gay

Dancing with the Stars 9 lost its first two contestants last night: Ashley Hamilton, son of George Hamilton, and Macy Gray, who got dumped after telling Samantha Harris, “I just feel like I busted my cherry.”

That’s what she said backstage Tuesday after her performance, causing censors to clip out the “busted” (maybe “popped”), because you know, that’s a terrible word that caused children everywhere to spontaneously combust.

Indicted former House majority leader Tom DeLay did not go home, although it looked like he might voluntarily leave while watching Adam Corolla berate him during a lame bit; Corolla was pretending to be a coach and told DeLay that he thinks he’s special “because you’re a white, middle-aged Republican.”

Anyway, this means DeLay can bring his extraordinarily feminine brand of masculinity back again next week. Speaking of that, here’s what he told Maureen Dowd of the New York Times earlier this week:

“I’m being more feminine and a little prissy. … My brain is telling my hips, ‘We don’t do that.’ It’s not like a speech or a press conference. This is exposing your soul. At the beginning, I told Cheryl, ‘No rhinestones, no frilly shirts and no pink.’ Well, it didn’t take Cheryl two seconds to put rhinestones on me. And she swears she’s going to put ruffles on me for the tango — probably pink.”

Dowd called his use of “prissy” an example of his “overcompensation” that means “I am not gay even though I have on heels and sparkles and want a disco-ball trophy.”

DeLay did get out a great zinger, though, when asked if he’d appear on another reality show after this. “No. I’d probably end up killing somebody on ‘Big Brother.’”

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.