Real World’s “hardcore audience is that 15 to 20-year-old,” cast is “left alone” in big cities

The Real World‘s co-creator, Jon Murray, says the show’s audience is not those of us who grew up with the show, nor even people in their 20s, like the cast members tend to be. Instead, it’s teenagers.

Answering a question about the show’s longevity, Jon Murray told Digital Spy, “It’s interesting; the viewers are not the same viewers who were watching in 1992. Every young person watching MTV has that point where they see The Real World for the first time. I think that’s partly why it continues to be a successful show, because we’ll pick up that person when they’re 15 or 16, and they’ll stay with the show for four or five years. Our hardcore audience is that 15 to 20-year-old kid.”

For those 30-somethings who are still watching and feel creepy or like a loser or like a creepy loser after reading that, don’t worry, because he’s kind of delusional, too, at least when answering a question about the show’s locations.

Jon Murray said that “the city is very important. Generally, the bigger the better — New York, L.A. are cities where we are not the biggest thing that are happening in that town. It’s great; we’re just like a nobody, as far as production when we’re shooting. So the cast members are left alone to do their thing and meet people. Whereas when you shoot in a smaller city, often the radio station and newspapers are talking about you — it’s like you’re the big news in the town, which is not what we want to be.”

I’d normally pick apart his insistence that the cast actually takes advantage of the city except as a source of alcohol, but instead I have to call him on the utter bullshit about the production not making news in big cities and being “just like a nobody” there, considering he said that at the same time his production is being relentlessly stalked in Washington, D.C.

Jonathan Murray (‘The Real World’, ‘Pedro’) [Digital Spy]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.