Ronnie evicted as viewers give Jeff power he hasn’t yet used

Big Brother 11 has lost its greatest self-proclaimed schemer ever, as Ronnie was evicted by a close 4 to 3 vote, and now we don’t have to watch him make that muppet face any more.

Ronnie was always a better player in his mind than he was on the show, although he was clearly affected both positively and negatively by the experience, which blindsided him in more ways than one. Maybe most notably, he locked himself in the HOH room for days after the house called him on his bullshit. Ronnie’s cluelessness was illustrated awesomely when he interrupted Jeff and Jordan making out by farting and begging with a sympathy vote.

Before Ronnie left, when Julie Chen asked for the nominees final thoughts, he said being on the show has been an “absolute dream for me,” which showed one side of him, and then he showed his other side, saying, “there’s so much good in all of you, except for you, Michele,” with whom he’s been feuding, although little of that has made it on TV. He then said “you are worst human being I have ever had the misfortune of meeting.”

That’s the third of three epic, entertaining, confrontational pre-eviction speeches this season, although the least articulate, since Ronnie stumbled through part of it. It’s so great that we don’t have to sit through bullshit anymore; this cast has a lot of faults, but at least they air their grievances when it matters. But the amusing line of the night went to Jordan, who lied to Russell when he interrupted a conversation by saying, “No, we were talking about literature and stuff,” Jordan told Russell. Oh, Jordan, if you had only read some literature and stuff.

Jeff won and did not use the new old power, the coup d’etat, not that he could pronounce it, and now he’s convinced America loves him and validates him, which would be fine if his likability didn’t come along with him being such a total ass.

One of the best things about Big Brother‘s often frustratingly limiting game structure is that the HOH competition and position makes weekly shake-ups possible, and that may happen this week, with Chima becoming HOH, succeeding the man she fought with and/or is aligned with. That epic Monday fight was condensed and presented fairly accurately during Thursday’s episode, and online, there continues to be debate about whether or not their fight was real or staged; it felt very authentic but also matched up to their conversation about staging a fight.

The HOH competition ended quickly, with Chima winning, so the studio audience got to ask annoyingly irrelevant and stupid questions. Yay.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.