SYTYCD turns 100 with its amazing dances dragged down by Katie Holmes

So You Think You Can Dance aired its 100th episode last night, and as usual, it was full of incredible dances and performances–except one, a super-hyped performance.

In one of the many ways it proves that it’s better TV than American Idol, the 100th episode was simply an hour and not dragged out, and started with a group dance that simply makes Idol‘s group numbers look embarrassing. Besides a recap of Wednesday’s episode, including Tyce Diorio’s breast cancer tribute that brought the judges to tears, there was an encore of Mia Michaels’ Emmy-winning “Bench” dance and Wade Robson’s “Hummingbird.”

Its only huge misstep was Katie Holmes’ performance, which was first announced more than a month ago and wasn’t anywhere near the quality we’ve come to expect from a show that’s consistently amazing even during its audition rounds, but especially now in the finals. She did “an homage to Judy Garland” (Judy Garland’s son was in the audience) that was choreographed by the normally fantastic Tyce Diorio, but she danced weakly and lip-synced to her own singing during the pre-taped segment. At least it was for charity.

At the end, Jason Glover and Janette Manrara were both eliminated. Nigel Lythgoe said he wanted Janette to win and her elimination “ruined this 100th celebration for me, to be honest.” Nice job, America: ruin Nigel’s day after he ruined ours with Katie Holmes.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.