Nigel Lythgoe to Katie Holmes “haters”: “You make me sick”

Katie Holmes “performance” on So You Think You Can Dance was pretty much universally derided, but Nigel Lythgoe is hating on all of us haters, threatening to “ban” people from following him on Twitter who didn’t like the performance he hyped for a month as being amazing.

In his angriest tweet, he wrote, “I’m going to ban all the Katie haters. You make me sick. Your attitude stops ‘stars’ doing charity work. Understand why she did it CHILDREN.” Nigel later called one person “ignorant” for criticizing him.

He also compared her to a celebrity throwing out a pitch: “I’m trying to figure out why Katie is being judged as a dancer. When a star throws out the opening pitch no-one says ‘ooh crap pitcher!'” I’m not sure that’s true, but I’m also sure that no one calls celeb first pitches “very, very special.”

Earlier, Nigel wrote, Why hate on Katie? She’s had no dance training and did this for publicity for the charity. Everyone lip synchs when they’re dancing. MJ too.”

Correct me if I’m wrong, but at least Michael Jackson lip synced while he actually danced, rather than shuffled around in an overproduced number that failed to show the talents of anyone involved.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.