Jordan Lloyd uses, apologizes for gay slurs on Big Brother 11

Watching the Showtime 2 version of the Big Brother 11 live feeds during the live blog/chat, we witnessed some live: waitress Jordan Lloyd used a derogatory word for gay people, offending Michele, who recently came out as bisexual.

Talking to her allies in the back yard and upset about the eviction of Braden, Jordan said Jessie is “the fag of America.” Michele walked away, asking her not to use that word, because it offended her, but insisting she’s not mad. There was some brief discussion about Michele’s bisexuality, and someone said something about Michele being married to a man, apparently not quite grasping the idea of bisexuality.

Jordan justified her comment, later saying, “I always say fag and I always say gay.” Do you want a medal, you idiot? Also during that conversation, Jeff volunteered to sleep in the same bed as Kevin, I think, apparently to prove how okay he is with gay people, despite the way he freely uses anti-gay language.

Ironically, at about that same time as Jordan said that, a producer’s voice could be heard saying “Lydia: stop that.” Yes, Lydia, stop whatever you’re doing so we don’t have to interrupt Jordan’s homophobia.

There is some good news: About an hour later, Jordan said, “Sorry for saying ‘fag.’ I didn’t mean to offend you. I say gay a lot. I need to work on that.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.