Heidi and Spencer’s possible return delayed as NBC exec calls them “everything that’s wrong with America”

NBC and the producers of I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here 2 are going to make us wait until Monday to see if Heidi and Spencer are going to be allowed back. I’d guess this actually means they’re not coming back, since they want to give us a reason to tune in Monday, instead of losing viewers who wouldn’t tune in Monday with them gone. But we shall see.

The episode saw the show’s first elimination: For some reason, Angela, one half of Frangela, was voted out over Tori; Janice unsurprisingly stayed so we can watch her further decompose in the jungle. There was also a challenge that didn’t have anything to do with insects, which is great, but it was definitely a weak version of a Survivor challenge, which is not.

Earlier, Angela said she’d leave if Heidi and Spencer came back because “it’s not fair, it’s not honest and responsible to anyone.” But it was Lou Diamond Phillips who had the best analysis. Arguing they shouldn’t return, he said in an interview, “That’s not how life works. … Perhaps in life they’re not forced to ever deal with the consequences at much, because at present they’re a commodity.”

Meanwhile, NBC’s new reality chief Paul Telegdy, who’s formerly with the BBC, said in a statement (that Ryan Seacrest thinks is exclusive but a version of which also went to the serious journalists at Access Hollywood, too) that Heidi and Spencer:

“are everything that’s wrong with America…they are insincere, lazy, entitled and they claim the devil has possessed them. They are back and this time they are contrite…yeah right. What they don’t realise is that they are now going to be examined and their value system utterly deconstructed. They are going to spend the night somewhere in isolation and guarded with lots of surprises…but not traditional reality [stunts].”

NBC Exec: Speidi Is ‘Everything That’s Wrong with America’ [Ryan Seacrest]
NBC executive not happy with Heidi, Spencer [Access Hollywood]

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.