VH1 announces even more insane dating shows; other series follow aircraft repo man, bad drivers, Pepa and Chilli

There have been a bunch of new show announcements recently, particularly from VH1, the network that is continuing to clone its culture-rotting dating series.

Yes, VH1 will not stop with the madness that is its series of outrageous dating shows led by nutballs personalities. For example, Beauty and the Geek, Rock of Love, I Love Money, and Charm School‘s Megan Hauserman, who sued Sharon Osbourne over a reunion fight will date multi-millionaires on Megan Wants a Millionaire starting August 2, and a day later, Real Chance of Love returns for a second season that’s subtitled “Back in the Saddle.” VH1 has also announced and is now casting for The Real Entertainer of Love, which stars I Love New York‘s Frank Maresca, aka the Entertainer.

The network also announced two non-dating reality series, one starring Sandra “Pepa” Denton and one with Chilli from TLC, “revolving around their current lives as single women,” plus The Price of Beauty, on which Jessica Simpson travels “all over the world to meet every day women” to “study the local fashions, dietary fads and beauty regimes and even participate in some of the extreme practices she discovers.”

Meanwhile, VH1’s sibling network MTV picked up Mark Burnett’s series that follows Audrina Patridge, for which Audrina quit MTV’s The Hills, and she told People that “We start filming at the end of the summer” and the new series will be “spicier, edgier, older,” with a focus on “romances.”

Otherwise, though, MTV’s announcement of six new shows includes just one new reality series: Cheetah Girl Adrienne Bailon will return to New York “to shed her packaged image, be her real self, and try to make it on her own,” MTV says about the new, still-untitled series. The network also renewed 16 & Pregnant for a second season.

The Travel Channel will search for the worst driver in the country in its series The Streets of America: The Search for America’s Worst Driver, which “is based on a successful overseas format that Travel has tweaked to closer fit its brand” and features “bad drivers [who] will compete in challenges in different cities,” but the least-bad drivers are the ones who get prizes, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

SOAPnet announced two new reality series: Bank of Mom and Dad, which debuts Sept. 30 and “invites the parents of women in their 20s and 30s to move into the kids’ homes for a week and exert influence over their finances,” and Holidate, which debuts July 29 and “offers a sort of dating version of ‘Wife Swap': Two women each week seek relationships in each other’s home city,” Variety reports.

On network television, ABC is developing Find My Family, which is based on the Dutch series Lost Without a Trace and “follows the stories of people desperate to find a long-lost relative or friend,” Variety reported.

Finally, a new show from the producer of Dirty Jobs and other actually real series, Craig Piligian, will follow a man who repossesses aircraft, from 747s to helicopters. He’s pitching a show to networks that will star Nick Popovich, the “co-partner of Sage-Popovich, a repossession firm that specializes in taking back big-ticket items — mostly airplanes,” according to Variety, which notes that a recent profile of Popovich in Salon “nearly derailed the whole arrangement” because “Popovich received inquiries and pitches from virtually every nonscripted producer in town.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.