Real World Cancun’s familiar cast members include friends, promiscuous people with drinking problems

MTV has revealed the eight Real World Cancun cast members who will come to television screens June 24, although the first episode, or some part of it, will be on MTV.com today.

As was previously announced, the cast will shill/work for StudentCity.com, or at least do their version of work. Executive producer Jon Murray says in MTV’s announcement, “The challenge for ‘The Real World: Cancun’ cast will be to separate work from play in an environment full of temptations.” In other words, how do you come to work blind drunk while trying to treat your newly acquired pubic lice?

Here are the eight cast members with highlights from their official MTV bios. Interestingly, two of the roommates already knew each other before the show: Derek and Jonna worked together at a Tempe bar. Speaking of Derek, he and CJ both have quotation marks around their names in the official release, which I’m guessing means they’re pseudonyms, because the really embarrassing part about being on this show is revealing your real name.

  • Ayiiia (yes, three Is), who’s 21 and was selected by viewers at realworldcasting.com. She has “a viciousness that alienates the other roommates” and “is a reformed party girl with a history of drug abuse and cutting.”
  • Bronne, who’s 21 and “is the resident comic,” MTV says–and he’s so crazy that he will “often get naked to just break up fights, or maybe just to show off the physique he gained while on the Penn State varsity boxing team.” He also has “impulsive behavior” and is “the first roommate to make out with a woman old enough to be his mother’s older sister.”
  • CJ, “an NFL free agent punter” who “would be a devout Christian if it weren’t for his sexual drive” and “takes pride in his hot body,” and apparently gets mocked for his metrosexuality.
  • Derek is 21 and “the resident nice guy,” in addition to being the resident gay guy. MTV says “all the roommates love him” even though he is “not afraid to be brutally honest about anything and everything.” He’s a super overachiever, the “president of the student council, captain of the basketball and track teams, and valedictorian of his graduating class,” and “[has] ex-boyfriend baggage that seems to follow him around….even to Cancun.”
  • Emilee is a 21-year-old “sensitive girl who can let her emotions get the best of her, but as the daughter of therapists, she is also on of the few people in the house who is looking to learn and grow and change as a result of every new situation,” MTV says.
  • Jasmine, 22, is five feet tall and weighs 95 pounds, and has “the absolute worst taste in men and always chooses unreliable players who treat her like dirt,” MTV says. She’s also a “former competitive cheerleader [who] thrives to be the center of attention, especially if other women are around.”
  • Joey, 22, “is the tall, skinny, tattooed rocker with the bad boy charm” and is “relentless in his pursuit of the women in Cancun and hopes to be the first roommate to hook-up.” He’s also “had more than a few bouts with excessive drinking, which will eventually become a problem in Cancun.” He plays guitar in a band called Late Nite Wars “and claims to have actually seen a UFO.”
  • Jonna, 20, is multi-racial and has a boyfriend to whom she “swears from day one that she’ll remain true,” according to MTV. She “is trying to stay focused and shake her promiscuous past, but she can’t help flirting, which turns on the guys in the house and pisses off the girls.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.