D.C. Housewives will be the latest in Bravo’s franchise

Bravo is spinning off yet another series from its Real Housewives franchise: The Real Housewives of D.C., which will be the fifth in the series.

In a press release, the network said it “is scouting the D.C. area to identify the city’s alluring and discriminating residents, those women who have their pulse on the most important cultural events, political galas, gallery openings and fundraisers in Washington society” and who “are the talk of the town in the most powerful city in the world.” Bravo executive Frances Berwick said in the announcement that they are “tapping personalities who are among Washington D.C.’s influential players, cultural connoisseurs, fashion sophisticates and philanthropic leaders – the people who rub elbows with the most prominent people in the country and easily move in the city’s diverse political and social circles.”

It’d also be helpful if the don’t mind being ruthlessly mocked for their shallowness, and can handle spending two hours with Andy Cohen.

The series will be produced by Half Yard Productions, which produced Discovery’s American Loggers. Different production companies produce the different spin-offs, perhaps to keep them fresh.

And that’s kind of a challenge with a fifth group of women. They’ve done well so far with the New York and Atlanta spin-offs, although New Jersey hasn’t yet caught my interest and seems comparatively dull, perhaps because it hasn’t yet found its footing, or because the cast is related and thus they actually have to deal with each other once filming ends.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.