Party planner calls Joan Rivers “a monster” and “unprofessional”

The party planner who quit Celebrity Apprentice 2 and caused its finale’s greatest conflict says Joan Rivers is an “unprofessional” “monster,” but also blames her focus on product placement over charity, and the producers’ rules that prevented him from offering creative input.

First, on his web site, David Tutera posted a statement that said, in part:

David Tutera was asked to be a part of The Celebrity Apprentice season finale by the show’s producers. As a celebrity event planner and designer for over twenty years, David was happy to assist Joan Rivers and Annie Duke in throwing a party as their final challenge. The name nor mission of the charity organization were not disclosed, despite numerous requests by David and it quickly became evident that Joan cared more about integrating the corporate sponsors into the event than benefiting the actual charity. …Joan Rivers’ unprofessional actions and attempts at creating false drama were unexpected and offensive. Rather than respond to Joan’s personal attack and participating in an event where the true focus was clearly forgotten, David graciously stepped away from the situation.”

Yesterday, David–who hosts WE tv’s My Fair Wedding–appeared on Barbara Walters’ Sirius XM show. Joan is “[s]uch a monster I cannot begin to even explain,” he said, according to the New York Daily News. “Her behavior towards any human being was so unacceptable to me.” He says he’d work for her again “[a]bsolutely over my dead body.”

That means Joan Rivers pretty much lied in the Boardroom when Annie Duke explained the designer quit because of Joan’s behavior, and Joan denied it (“this is an out-and-out lie, and I will not have this on television,” she said) and then took her normal ad hominem attack route by suggesting Annie’s donors were members of the mafia.

But Joan’s big complaint–that party planner David wasn’t offering her creative solutions–was accurate, because he wasn’t allowed to help, and she wasn’t any help. “Joan and Melissa [Rivers] were completely incapable of giving me their insight on how the party should look. They had zero direction. The rules of the show were, that the producers said to us, that we cannot, me as the person executing the challenge, give the celebrities ideas,” he told Barbara Walters.

Event designer who quit during Donald Trump’s ‘Celebrity Apprentice’ says Joan Rivers is a ‘monster’ [New York Daily News]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.