Dad and son face off for final spot in Biggest Loser 7 finale

Just as it did Sunday night, NBC is devoting its entire three-hour prime-time schedule for a reality show finale, as The Biggest Loser 7 will conclude live. That makes sense because the reality series, which has aired two-hour episodes this season, is the network’s most-popular reality series and some weeks, the most-popular show period.

After the contestants ran 26.2 miles last week–an ironic challenge considering how much flak a contestant this season got for pretending to run a marathon (although he later actually did), the show had to narrow its final four to a final three to see who would compete for the $250,000 prize.

Instead of allowing tearful voting in front of Allison “I pause for 45 seconds in-between every word” Sweeney, the show let viewers decide. The options are Mike and Ron Morelli, who happen to be father and son, so that father versus son thing will probably be milked for about 45 minutes. Helen Phillips and Tara Costa are already safely in the top three.

The best part about the finale is always the incredibly bad product placement acting–I mean, the transformations that the contestants undergo. Mike and Tara already look like a completely different people, as he’s lost 174 pounds and she’s lost 135, and all through just diet, exercise, and Jennie-O Turkey.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.