Nine years, five logos: a reality blurred redesign preview

On Monday, reality blurred will look different. Although the content will stay the same–and actually improve as a result of the redesign, I hope–it will have a new look and feel, one that I’ve been working on since the new year.

The new logo represents its most radical redesign since I shifted from the way-too-literal, what-the-hell-was-I-thinking actually blurry text and photographic TV image that the site was born with. But soon it found a new identity, and then shed that new logo’s baby fat with two subsequent versions, all of which kept the same TV logo. Few people, as far as I know, were ever aware that it was supposed to reflect the self-referencing nature of the genre: shaped like a TV screen, it has a TV, and thus another screen, inside of it, a TV inside a disembodied TV screen. Okay, maybe I don’t even quite get it since I can’t explain it very coherently.

The new logo, which you can see below, is smoother and cleaner, and moves away from the literal TV images that too many other sites are using, exchanging it for one that is more abstract but also still illustrates, on some level, the layering of reality and the blurred edges that the genre brings us on a regular basis. Besides its quasi-optical illusion, the old-fashioned TV set shape also looks like a camera lens. Because of that, it references the first logo, although that was unintentional. And yes, I’ve thought about all this way too much.

With the new logo’s debut, I thought it’d be fun to take a look back at the various iterations of the logo, which are below. For simplicity’s sake, they exclude the tagline and the most important part, my name. (I’ve also excised the logo from the unfortunate few months in 2003 during which the TV had static in it–and if you remember that, you deserve some kind of prize, such as a life.)

I’m psyched about the new identity and new features you’ll see Monday, and while I know it won’t please everyone, I hope you like it. I also hope that, in nine years, this new logo doesn’t look as hideously amateurish as the first one does to me now.

reality blurred logos over time

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.