Ryan Seacrest blames producers for overrun; critics call director Bruce Gowers “incompetent”

Ryan Seacrest’s DVR recording of the show he actually hosts was also affected by its eight-minute overrun that left Adam Lambert’s performance out of DVR recordings for many viewers. But the American Idol host says it wasn’t his fault and blamed the show’s producers, although at least one blogger is calling for the show’s “incompetent” director, Bruce Gowers, to be fired.

After the show ran over, a viewer complained to Seacrest on Twitter: “WTF, Seacrest! Host your fucking show better! I don’t get to see all of the performers because it ran over and I record it.”

Seacrest responded by blaming producers: “idol went long. producers build the show time… 8 singers 4 judges… my tivo cut out too.” Later, he announced that he’d put video of Adam’s performance on his site.

But Bruce Gowers, the director who left last year but returned this season, is getting the blame from in-the-know bloggers and critics. His direction is often pretty abysmal even when the show comes in on time. As Marc Hirsh previously wrote, one of American Idol‘s “lies” is “Directed by Bruce Gowers,” saying Gowers “ability to pace a broadcast to come in on time is nonexistent” and calling him “incompetent from a technical standpoint.”

Vote for the Worst’s response to last night said “Bruce Gowers is a fucking idiot who can’t get a show to finish up in an hour (ever thought to get rid of the stool chats, Bruce? How stupid are you?).” And MJ says, simply, that he “needs to be fired. I swear.”

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.