Steve-O injures himself again; celebrities may receive $200,000 for the season

Another day, another Dancing with the Stars 8 injury: Unbelievably, Steve-O injured himself yet again, this time during his live Monday performance.

At the end of his live performance of the foxtrot, he accidentally slid into the stairs and hit his ankle, and although he recovered quickly, he sat there for a few moments. “I’m fine, I’m fine,” he insisted, but his partner Lacey Schwimmer said, “He did definitely tweak his ankle just now and hurt his back again.” That’s in addition to his hematoma and the back injury that forced him out of last Monday’s live show.

His dance wasn’t good, as he grimaced through much of it, and also admitted, “I kind of drew a blank a little bit.” Carrie Ann Inaba told him, “I can see you’re in genuine pain,” yet the judges only gave him 15.

Still, that was better than the score the other injured competitor received. Woz injured himself Friday and “pulled a hamstring,” he said. “It feels to me right now that there’s no way in the world I could possibly be dancing on Monday.” He noted that “the show cares a lot about my health” and said producers said he could drop out, but he did perform.

However, he sucked. Carrie Ann said, “the novelty wears off at some point,” and Len Goodman told him, “I think the dances are killing you” and called it “terrible from start to finish.” Woz received a 10: total.

So how much do the celebrities who subject themselves to these kinds of injuries make? Somewhere around a quarter million dollars.

Yahoo TV has a story from The Wrap that says “a top TV agent” said that the pay for the show is $200,000 and “a bonus of $100,00 if they’re number one, a smaller bonus if they’re number two, an even smaller bonus if they’re number 3.”

However, the version of that story on The Wrap’s own web site is missing that entire paragraph, and instead says later in the story, “Someone who makes it to the finals on “DWTS” is looking at a fee in the $250,000-$300,000 range.” Still, the site has a chart of estimated compensation for last season’s contestants that is based on the information that’s now missing from the story.

And never mind that a separate story on The Wrap’s own site contradicts the assertion that winners receive a bonus. How very credible! In an interview, the show’s senior talent producer Deena Katz says celebrities “don’t get money when they win. They’re just winning a trophy.”

Even with all of those contradictions, The Wrap’s estimate does jibe with Howard Stern’s assertions about the show’s pay, which were previously the only solid information about compensation.

Before the third season, he said his girlfriend Beth Ostrosky was offered pay based upon the length of time one stayed on the show: $125,000 for the first two weeks, $20,000 for each additional week, and $50,000 for a recap show, which for the length of the season back then worked out to a max of $245,000 for those who made it to the end.

Reality Shows Pay With Resuscitated Careers [Yahoo]
Reality Shows Pay With Resuscitated Careers and Talent Hunter for ‘Dancing With the Stars’ Spills Secrets [The Wrap]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.