Woz, Steve-O stay, Denise Richards leaves despite improvement

Despite improving the score she received from the judges, Denise Richards was eliminated from Dancing with the Stars 8. Both Woz and Steve-O were safe, thanks to their fans’ support, since they definitely didn’t have the judges’ support.

When she learned she and Woz were safe, Karina shrieked, and later Woz said, “I am more shocked than any time in my life than maybe when I got served with divorce papers.” Samantha Harris decided to take credit for her vote-whoring, saying, “See folks? You listen to me, it works sometimes.” Then she threw back to Tom Bergeron with a bit of an overshare that revealed how she thinks Tom perceives her: “Tom–someone who doesn’t listen to me–Tom.”

During the live results show, Cloris Leachman and Corky Ballas returned to demonstrate the Lindy Hop and the Argentine Tango. But the producers showed their slightly amusing demonstration as a faux silent movie, perhaps to ensure Cloris didn’t upstage any of this season’s competitors, all of whom, with the exception of Woz, are comparatively a lot more boring.

Also in the bottom two was Holly Madison, who received 18 points after her dance-off performance, improving her score by one; Denise received 20 points, four more than the 16 she earned Monday. While Len Goodman said Denise’s dance was her chance to “prove that you deserve to stay” and “tonight, you do,” she was still eliminated.

There was a bit of drama during the actual scoring: After Denise’s new scores were revealed, Samantha Harris said, “Carrie Ann held up the wrong paddle there,” but she didn’t: Carrie Ann both said “six” and held up a six paddle. The on-screen tally showed 7. And Bruno held up a 7 but the on-screen score said 6.

The math worked out the same both ways, but even Tom Bergeron was confused. “They’re telling that Carrie Ann wrote 7 on the piece of paper,” he said, and she insisted, “No I did not. I wrote six.” Tom recovered gracefully, saying, “Join us for our new show, Carrie Ann and the People in the Booth Have it Out.”

And also for our new show, ABC is so Damn Cheap that they Can’t Afford a Judging System Other than a Piece of Paper and a Runner to Deliver it to the Booth.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.