DeShawn fired from Real Housewives for being “too human for a circus show”

DeShawn Snow won’t be part of The Real Housewives of Atlanta‘s second season, but not because she’s left the show. Instead, she was essentially fired by its producers for being boring and not “real enough.”

DeShawn told Essence magazine that “one of the producers called me yesterday [Tuesday] and said that they wouldn’t take my option” because she “was ‘too human for a circus show’ and that because the show did so well, they are about to pump up the drama and they didn’t think that I would fit in.”

Specifically, the producer told DeShawn “that during the reunion when I found out what a few of the other ladies said about me, they were expecting me to say more, but I’m not the type to go ‘television’ and start acting crazy because somebody’s talking about me.”

As to her being let go, DeShawn “didn’t see it coming” and “was a little hurt” and “was shocked,” but said, “I’m fine with the decision. It wasn’t my decision. They let me go and there are no hard feelings. I am thankful for the opportunity.”

DeShawn wasn’t able to confirm that Tameka Foster will join the show as her replacement, but said “I wouldn’t say that they are replacing me because they didn’t think I was real enough or too real enough for the show, so I doubt they are going to bring in someone who has a similar personality as mine.”

DeShawn Snow No Longer a ‘Real’ Housewife: ‘I Didn’t See It Coming’ [Essence]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.