SYTYCD winner Joshua: “I want to be a recording artist”

So You Think You Can Dance 4 winner Joshua Allen may have won the Fox dance competition, but he also has aspirations better suited to those who appear on American Idol.

“Overall, I want to be a recording artist. I want to be singer,” he told the Fresno Bee. But he won’t give up dancing. “I still want to push my dancing career. And I believe if you want to be a good dancer, you have to be well-rounded. You really have to know your stuff. At an audition, they might want a hip-hop dancer who can do pirouettes,” he said.

Joshua is currently dancing on the show’s national tour, which The Los Angeles Times reviewed and said “had the celebratory, experimental feeling of kids partying when their parents go of town.” The paper says that, of all the finalists, “Gev Manoukian was the one who left the audience in stitches. Gev’s unrequited love for dance partner Courtney Galiano was a running joke on the TV show, and Gev continued his pursuit over the course of the stage show. As always, Courtney rebuffed him. The audience was so charmed by Gev, in fact, that Courtney’s rejection of him elicited the only boo of the evening.”

A conversation with ‘Dance’ winner Joshua [Fresno Bee]
‘So You Think You Can Dance’ tour: No judges allowed [Los Angeles Times]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.