Anthrax suspect threatened to kill Kathryn Price

The Mole‘s original mole, Kathryn Price, was threatened by the man who the FBI and Justice Department say is responsible for killing people with mailed anthrax in 2001.

Army researcher Dr. Bruce Ivins, who killed himself in late July, was apparently fascinated by Kathryn and wrote about killing her in an early July 2008 e.mail message, which is quoted by the Los Angeles Times. It apparently references the seventh episode’s game during which Steven blindfolded the other players and convinced them to perform tasks; Kathryn was supposed to allow a someone to throw a hatchet at her, although ultimately that didn’t really happen. Ivins wrote:

“He should have taken the hatchet and brought it down hard and sharply across her neck, severing her carotid artery and jugular vein. Then when she hits the ground, he completes the task on the other side of the neck, severing her trachea. . . . I personally would have paid big money to have do[n]e it myself. The least someone could do would be to take a sharp ballpoint pin or letter opener and put her eyes out, to complete the task of making her a true mole!”

If that isn’t disturbing enough, NBC News’ Pete Williams reports that Ivins also “posted several messages on the You Tube web site about Kathryn Price, a contestant on the ABC reality show ‘The Mole,’ saying that Moles should be killed, he wrote, adding that she could be attacked with a hatchet or blinded with a sharp pen.” The next day, he “sent an e-mail to a Kathryn Price, in which he claimed to be a woman name Cindy Wood,” according to NBC News.

That message said, “I’ve been a fan of yours … and I wondered if you are going to have any public appearances where people could meet you.”

Ivins claimed he knew who sent anthrax [Los Angeles Times]
Anthrax suspect threatened reality TV contestant [NBC News]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.