NBC will air celebrity dinner party show; Fox Reality orders third Solitary

NBC plans to air five episodes of a show that will feature celebrities having a dinner party for four other celebrities, and then getting judged on their food. Celebrity Come Dine With Me–which is just a working title, thankfully–“is based on a format owned by Granada that’s found success in 16 countries, including the U.K., where the show has aired four seasons since 2005. The overseas versions have mainly showcased nonfamous contestants, though some also have experimented with celebrity contestants,” according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The paper says that “the celebrity whose party receives the highest score wins $20,000 for … charity, and “the show’s green light hinges on lining up a suitable cast.” With that in mind, why exactly NBC went with a celebrity version instead of a real person version is beyond me, especially because they’ll probably land such A-listers as Christopher Knight; Jillian, the Biggest Loser trainer; and Andy Cohen.

Seriously, they couldn’t find any real stars for the cast of Celebrity Circus, just like they couldn’t get any real stars to show up for Celebrity Cooking Showdown, a short-lived, bad-idea competition the network aired two years ago. The success of Celebrity Apprentice, which itself is not even teeming with A-listers, is probably to blame for the celebrity angle, but an untested new show is probably not going to draw the same type of people as Donald Trump.

Meanwhile, the Fox Reality Channel has ordered a third season of its show Solitary, which locks contestants in small cells and tortures them until everyone except one person gives up. The winner gets a whole $50,000. The show is the network’s “most successful original production,” Variety reports. While the previous two seasons have aired at the end of the summer, there’s no word of an airdate or casting yet.

NBC cooks up ‘Celebrity’ reality show [Hollywood Reporter]
‘Solitary’ gets third season pickup [Variety]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.