Big Brother After Dark includes legal disclaimer required of pornographic movies

One side effect of returning to the east coast after a month on the west coast was adapting to the time change. Mostly, it meant that I’d try to go to sleep at normal hours, but instead be awake until 3 or 4 a.m. And on more than one occasion, I found myself watching Big Brother After Dark, the live feed from the house that airs on Showtime Too from midnight to 3 a.m. ET. A lot of it was boring and just background noise as I did something else, but I saw the post-feast fight live, and that was pretty fascinating.

One night, I kept watching after the feed was cut and the brief credits rolled, and noticed a quick disclaimer that seemed familiar. It’s probably been shown after the After Dark episodes since they first started airing last summer, but I’ve never seen it (because I’ve never made it to the end of an episode). The disclaimer was the U.S.C Title 18 § 2257 record keeping requirement statement, which is basically required to certify that actors are of legal age in porn–not that I’ve ever seen that before, ever. Here’s the full statement that pornographers are now required to display on their adult videos:

U.S.C. Title 18 Section 2257 Compliance Statement. To the extent that this Episode #081208 of “Big Brother After Dark”, produced 8/12/2008 contains visual depictions of actual sexually explicit conduct, records attesting that all persons engaged in such conduct were over 18 years of age at the time the depictions were created, have been compiled and are maintained as required by 18 U.S.C. §2257 by the following Custodians of Record.”

Those “custodians of record” were listed as “Our House Productions, Inc.,” and Showtime Networks, and there were mailing addresses for both. Clearly, the statement runs on every episode regardless of the content, just to make sure the producers are protected in the event that something does transpire.

To my knowledge, and someone more knowledgeable about the live feeds than me is free to correct this, but the After Dark show has never aired “actual sexually explicit conduct.” However, with April and Ollie still in the Big Brother 10 house, that’s perhaps more likely than ever before, since they continue to have sex, now with bonus body-slapping noises.

Speaking of Ollie and April, they had a conversation on last night’s CBS episode about their relationship, and assured us that their it is actually real, not that we’ve ever heard that before. Ollie told us, “My relationship with April is far beyond what some people may call a showmance. This is something that’s real, and having something potentially outside of the house is not out of the question right now.” Of course, he was ready to dump his romance, insisting to Renny later that he wasn’t just there for a showmance when Renny pointed out that he had an alliance with April.

In a conversation the couple had in bed, filmed by night vision cameras, Ollie joked, “will you marry me?” April turned to the camera and said, “you just got that on TV, right?”, indicating that she still remembers and understands that even at night, with the lights off, the cameras capture everything.

Earlier, we saw a conversation between the two during which Ollie asked, “Is it bad to be sexually attracted to your best friend?” and April said, “No, that’s perfect.” And April also insisted, “I’m seriously not leaving your side when we get out of this”–perhaps because she’s actually stuck to him.

BB10 April & Ollie have sex for the ???????????????th time [YouTube]

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.