Omarosa: “I would rather be ABW–angry black woman–than a buffoon”

Having been out of the spotlight for about half a year, Omarosa has found herself back in it–or dragged it over and shined it upon herself, actually–after appearing on Wendy Williams’ new daytime talk show.

The segment starts with Omarosa getting confrontational. “This is not your time to look for your moment,” Wendy says, but of course, that’s exactly what it becomes as Omarosa refuses to show the book she’s promoting–tellingly titled The Bitch Switch: Knowing How to Turn It on and Off–to the camera, first ripping it out of Wendy’s hands. Later, Wendy told Omarosa, “In many ways, you are the stereotypical angry black woman that white America looks at us as.” Omarosa said, “I would rather be ABW–angry black woman–than a buffoon.” (Watch the segment).

Omarosa also goes back to that “you don’t know me, you really don’t” argument that’s basically a confession of her fakeness. It’s just so painfully obvious that she’s playing a role, because she accidentally slips into her normal, intelligent self occasionally. She relishes the attention so much that I almost didn’t post this, because people that desperate for attention deserve none.

After the episode taped, Wendy Williams told the AP, “I wanted to throw her off the set. … Omarosa wished her career was my career. Omarosa is a delusional, D-list, pathetic woman. … I have no reason to invite Omarosa back to the show. That’s done. She had her moment.”

TV host Williams: Omarosa ‘delusional, pathetic’ [AP]
Omarosa/Wendy Williams Encounter Goes Pretty Much As Well As You’d Think It Would [B-Side Blog]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.