New timeslot gives Project Runway a slight increase in overall viewers, decrease in 18-49

Bravo’s actions may seem like it is trying to destroy Project Runway even as the show received five Emmy nominations, but ratings stayed about the same from last season. That lack of growth might be news, considering previous growth from season to season, but the show also dropped to an earlier, more competitive timeslot.

Last night, 2.915 million people watched the debut, according to Bravo. That’s up slightly from the 2.89 million people who watched season four’s debut, although that, of course, aired an hour later.

However, the show lost a few younger viewers ages 18 to 49, as 1.81 million watched, compared to 1.981 million last season. As to the new timeslot, Bravo said in a press release that the show “had the network’s highest delivery in adults 18-49 (1.81 million) and total viewers (2.915 million).”

While a few of the designers demonstrated some outstanding creativity, from the Solo cup dress to the vacuum cleaner bag dress, most seemed lazy–and the whole episode came off somewhat lazy, with the repeat of the first challenge and everyone sort of just going through the motions. Perhaps I’m too hyper-conscious of these sorts of things, but the editing made the conclusion super-obvious; they only focused on the people who ended up in the bottom and at the top, and it was pretty clear who would be going home.

More significantly, Tim Gunn had zero energy in the workroom, robotically repeating his catchphrases, at least until he awesomely yelled at the designers for all using tablecloths in their outfits: “I just think the judges are going to say, you guys are a bunch of slackers,” he said. Kind of like the producers?

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.