Emmys will be hosted by all five nominated reality show hosts

All five Emmy-nominated reality TV hosts–Tom Bergeron, Heidi Klum, Howie Mandel, Jeff Probst, and Ryan Seacrest–will collectively host the Emmys on Sept. 18. In other words, the Academy is going to make them work.

Emmy telecast executive producer Ken Ehrlich told The Hollywood Reporter that the decision “was pretty obvious” even before the nominees were annnounced. “When we saw the nominees (in the category), they turned out to be such a a perfect group of people,” he said. “This gives us the opportunity to be very contemporary and current on a show where we also will celebrate the history of the TV Academy and the history of television.”

The paper says that the five “know each other well, were approached and quickly agreed to come on board. Details on how the five will share the hosting duties are still being worked out, but they are expected to be together on stage at some point.”

Seacrest and Bergeron clearly have the advantage here, and my guess is they’ll get the most air time because their shows are the most similar to the live Emmy broadcast. I’d also predict that Heidi Klum is all but absent through most of the show–since, let’s be honest, she’s more of a judge than a host on Project Runway, because her hosting consists of essentially saying the same lines every week.

And the show probably won’t be able to resist the urge to have each host parody or mimic their own series’ format at some point while stars and producers of scripted shows sit in the audience and either cringe or start texting their managers, asking them to book reality TV show gigs immediately.

Reality host nominees to co-host Emmys [Hollywood Reporter]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.