Ratings drop for Big Brother, tying record lows

After having its lowest-rated debut ever on Sunday, Big Brother 10 lost a few viewers for its weeknight episodes, and was down from last summer.

On Tuesday, the show’s second episode–which aired against the all-star game–was watched by 6.1 million viewers, “in line with its Sunday season premiere and down 15% from its Tuesday debut in 2007,” Variety reports. It was beaten among viewers 18 to 49 by ABC’s I Survived a Japanese Game Show.

On Wednesday, among people ages 18 to 49, it “[tied] the lowest outing in series history,” and also tied Univision’s “Al Diablo con los Guapos,” according to Media Life. TV By the Numbers says that just 5.75 million watched during the first half-hour, when the houseguests put on a hysterical self-deprecating puppet show, while 6.06 million tuned in the second half-hour, when Julie Chen presided over yet another ridiculous HOH challenge (guess what everyone else is about to guess!).

Overall, those two half hours average to 5.9 million viewers for the hour, down from even Tuesday’s tough competition. Sad, considering that the show is actually better than it’s been in a while.

Fox an All-Star on Tuesday [Variety]
Fox waltzes off with Wednesday night [Media Life]
Nielsen Ratings Wednesday, July 16: All Dance, All the Time [TV By the Numbers]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.