Spencer Pratt says he gets $100,000 “minimum” for appearances; Letterman calls him a “dope”

Spencer Pratt appeared on David Letterman’s show Friday night for some reason, perhaps because it was the 13th and he’s a pop culture demon. The results were very entertaining, because despite being a self-professed “improv TV personality,” Spencer basically sat there like a lump the whole time.

It was also horrifying, because Spencer claimed he receives “minimum $100,000″ to appear at a club. “Seriously, I won’t got a club now for less than $100,000,” he said. Letterman wasn’t buying it. “Nobody is giving you 100,000 to leave the house, really,” he said. “You’d be shocked,” Spencer said.

When Letterman talked to Heidi, who was relegated to the green room, she said, “I thought he was lowballing it.” Letterman said, “Oh stop it. What does he bring a pony and kids have their pictures taken on it?”

As the interview started, Letterman said to Spencer, “On the show, you’re a dope,” and asked him if that was accurate. He relentlessly mocked Spencer, who tried to be somewhat witty but didn’t really succeed, and he let most of Letterman’s barbs stick in him. For example, Letterman said, mockingly, “you’re a show business visionary, then.” Spencer replied, “I try to be.” Brilliant improv, man.

Here’s the whole glorious segment:

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.