Survivor Gabon has “a danger problem with animals,” other problems related to the production

The upcoming season of Survivor Gabon is already experiencing pre-production problems relating to wildlife and shipping, among other things, Jeff Probst says.

Among other things, the crew will be in tents because their housing has not arrived. “Our shipping has been really delayed. One aspect of Survivor that is different from a lot of shows is that we have to ship throughout the season, and we’re about 30 days behind now, which is a major problem. We’re going to be fine on the show, but the crew housing is not there. We’re going to be in tents,” Jeff told the AP.

He also said that the new season, which is taglined “Earth’s Last Eden,” has a wild animal problem. “We have a danger problem with animals that we’re trying to figure out how to handle. There’s so much truly wild life out there, we’re not sure what to do. We don’t want the animals around for a safety reasons, but we’d love to have a hippo sneak in every so often. I just got a call from our executive producer that we’ve got hippo tracks at base camp,” Jeff said.

The AP reports that “Probst also said a crane had fallen over and a cargo hold containing about $100,000 worth of food had gone missing. The lumber used for building props and set pieces for challenges and Tribal Council, however, had safely arrived.”

However, Jeff’s not concerned. “These things for us usually have a way of turning into good things,” he said.

Probst: Production problems on ‘Survivor: Gabon’ [AP]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.