Tim Gunn “concerned” about three Runways in a year, “nervous” about season 6

Project Runway 5 begins production in New York City this week, and it’s the final season that will air on Bravo and the final season to be produced by Magical Elves. It will also be the second of three seasons that air this year.

All of those things are enough to make any fan freak out a little, and that includes the series’ mentor and co-host, Tim Gunn. Regarding airing three seasons in one year, Tim told the Chicago Tribune’s Maureen Ryan, “I’m concerned. But enough already. But you know, it’s done.”

Always candid (which is why we love him), Tim also talked with her about season six, which he says makes him “nervous,” although he says he “[has] the greatest confidence in Lifetime and in [its executives]” who are “completely committed, if its possible, to making it even better.”

Still, Tim said, “I’m admittedly nervous [about Season 6] because I don’t know how it’s going to be, and I’m going to be in a city that’s not my home.” It will also not have the same producers. “Are they the only good producers in the world? No. But they are responsible for the show as we know it. And we are launching Season 6 in an entirely different place, not metaphorically, but physically,” he said.

But that new city–the show is moving to Los Angeles for part of its season, yet another change–offers possibility. Tim said, “we’ll have a whole new physical context. We have lots of new opportunities opened up to us in terms of challenges and guests and locations for challenges. … And there is something positive [about being in L.A.] — it’s a bit like our Season 3 trip to Paris, except we’re staying there.”

‘Project Runway’s’ future: Hot mess or haute stuff? Tim Gunn tells all [Chicago Tribune]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.