Bravo spins off Top Chef Junior, a cooking competition for teenagers

The continued success of Top Chef has led Bravo to order two new cooking-themed shows, including a spin-off of Top Chef called Top Chef Junior.

That show–shouldn’t it be Junior Top Chef or Top Junior Chef?–will be “an eight episode series where teens (likely ages 13 to 16) will compete to see if they have what it takes to become a junior ‘Top Chef,'” according to a Bravo press release.

In the release, Bravo EVP Frances Berwick said, “With ‘Top Chef Junior’ we’re reaching a growing market and are developing a series that will teach and test the skills of younger aspiring chefs and appeal to the whole family.” And as we all know, kid-themed series do super-well.

Meanwhile, the network will also produce an yet-to-be-titled show that follows chef Jean-Christophe Novelli’s “move to Los Angeles as he opens a cooking school and trains professional chefs and those who aspire to cook like professionals,” Bravo says, taking care to point out that he was “[v]oted ‘World’s Sexiest Chef’ by The New York Times, Novelli is a Michelin and 5AA Rosette award-winning chef with restaurants in London, France and South Africa.” It’s produced by Work Out producers Mentorn USA.

Bravo Announces Development of “Top Chef Junior”… [Bravo press release]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.