Allison Grodner promises Big Brother 10 cast is “wildest group yet” with “extreme personalities”

Big Brother 10 selected its finalists late last month, according to casting director Robyn Kass, and now the show’s executive producer insists that the new cast will be crazy–and old. (The show doesn’t debut until July 13.)

In a TV Guide item that’s not on the magazine’s web site but that has been reproduced widely online, Allison Grodner said, “We’re going to have our wildest group yet. We’ve found some very extreme personalities with very extreme points of view,” she said. As to older people, they were inspired by season eight’s winner (Dick) and season nine’s annoying Sheila. “They’re seeing that the younger contestants are impulsive and explosive and do themselves in. The older ones now feel they’ve got a real shot at the money,” she said.

I think the “wildest” and “extreme” adjectives are supposed to make us feel better after the craptastic group that inhabited the house during season nine, but it really just frightens me. Considering how extreme the cast members already tend to be, can we really handle even more “extreme points of view”? Plus, I don’t really like contestants like Dick, especially if they’re not balanced out. After all, my favorite season featured some actually smart contestants, in addition to a couple with over-the-top personalities and others who were boring-ass weenies.

Then again, Grodner’s very good at bullshitting about her show, so maybe this is just all hype to convince us to come back. Remember when she told Julie Chen that each Big Brother 9‘s cast member’s “life in the house depends on this other person” who was “their perfect love match”? And then three weeks later they split the couples and pretended that never happened?

Big Brother 10 [MySpace]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.