Parvati won because of “truthful” answers, Cirie says; tiebreaker still unknown

Parvati Shallow beat Amanda Kimmel and won Survivor Micronesia as a result of the answers the two women gave at the final Tribal Council, according to their alliance mate Cirie Fields, although Amanda only says she made mistakes.

“I just did a lot of things wrong and I really don’t know what else to say,” Amanda told Reality TV World, demonstrating her not-very-powerful powers of persuasion. (She does, however, apparently have strong acting abilities, as she says she’s been cast in a movie. “I found out from Micronesia that I’m a pretty good actress, so I got this film. It’s called The Reef by Charles Winkler. It’s filming in Hawaii in a couple of days actually,” she said.)

In a separate interview, Cirie offered insight into why Amanda lost and Parvati won. “Parvati was good with her answers [to the jury]. Amanda’s answers weren’t true,” Cirie told Reality TV World. “So I think Parvati’s answers came across more truthful and that’s why she won.”

As it happened, Parvati’s answers gave her five votes to Amanda’s three, but what would have happened in the event of a four to four tie? Amanda said that even the cast members don’t know, as Jeff Probst “didn’t ever tell us. There was a white envelope. I don’t know what was in it, but that was supposed to be the tie-breaker if there was one. But I have no idea. I know as much about it as you do,” she said.

Exclusive: Amanda Kimmel discusses ‘Micronesia,’ losing ‘Survivor’ twice and Exclusive: Cirie Fields talks about her ‘Survivor: Micronesia’ experience [Reality TV World]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.