Paula Abdul: “I loved that people laughed, it was funny”

To officially end the days of slow news week pseudo-controversy over her on-air screw-up, Paula Abdul says she is glad people are laughing at her, and she even mocked herself, thereby making it nearly impossible for those people to laugh at her any more.

“I have fun poking fun at a situation that’s so ridiculous. I’m the queen of taking the seriousness out of [it] … I loved that people laughed, it was funny. Honestly, it was a silly thing [that happened on Idol]. We were all confused … I did exactly what the producers told me to do … It’s all good,” she told People.

At a Lupus L.A. event, Paula presented an award to her doctor, and asked him, “By the way, are you singing two songs tonight?” She also said that he “helped save my business and my professional life,” and then joked, “By the way, they’re causing me to say very mumbly-jumbly things on Idol. Help me.”

Meanwhile, executive producer and Fremantle executive Cecile Frot-Coutaz says Paula’s job is safe. “I love that everyone was talking about it. It was so unexpected. It was something that took up 2 seconds of airtime. You’d think there was no other news on television,” she told the AP. “Why would we get rid of Paula?”

That’s a fantastic question, considering Paula’s screw-up was the most interesting thing to happen on the show over the past few months. Plus, if they really were going to fire her, there were many other far more opportune moments.

Paula Abdul: ‘No One Understands Me’ [People]
‘Idol’ boss says Paula isn’t going anywhere [AP]

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.